Poll

Which best describes your feelings about investing?

"Better safe than sorry."
"Moderation in all things."
"Nothing ventured, nothing gained."

Author Topic: 3i Investing Whispers  (Read 817233 times)

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #50 on: July 02, 2011, 02:19:36 PM »
Nestlé's values n core philosophy has generated huge goodwill. plus i m seeing firsthand how halal concept n requirements hav blossom in europe  n other parts of the world. this i guess will benefit Nestlé Malaysia enormously as the halal hub of them.

can they grow 10% per year? can they payout 90% continuously?

will c? might b less but potentially more!!!!............hopefully!!!!(then gonna tell the kids, papa bought Nestlé for you guys but it didnt turn out well!!!!)

 ;)
Just do the maths mah...let say grow 10% p.a. payout 100%....when catch up with Rm 48.00 share price leh !?

Offline soulsimple

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #51 on: July 02, 2011, 02:22:23 PM »
Just do the maths mah...let say grow 10% p.a. payout 100%....when catch up with Rm 48.00 share price leh !?

NPV is a calculation of a fair price of today. if your inputs r right n constant the fair price adjust goin forward!!!!

 ;)
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That's why we just don't hear much about them.

Offline leno

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #52 on: July 02, 2011, 02:24:06 PM »
i did ask myself this with reference to analabs. is it sustainable, will it continue to grow n grow into the future? what business r they in? what is their core business? where is the 'moat'? what is their competitive advantage? is it durable?

 ;)

u see .. i dont waste time asking this and that ... instead of asking ... i search for answer straight away.
While ppl asking this and that ... talking about what moat ... questioning sustainable or not ..
i busy collecting at 80 sen until become top 2 outsider shareholder .. right behind grahamsmun ...
BEST !

 :D :D :D

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #53 on: July 02, 2011, 02:37:39 PM »
u see .. i dont waste time asking this and that ... instead of asking ... i search for answer straight away.
While ppl asking this and that ... talking about what moat ... questioning sustainable or not ..
i busy collecting at 80 sen until become top 2 outsider shareholder .. right behind grahamsmun ...
BEST !

 :D :D :D

Everi business got is value & usefulness....just like rubber glove, palm oil , cars, construction all got it own competitiveness.....thats why they make money loh...!
Of course....some business don have brand.....but then a slightly lower PE already compensate for this disadvantage mah....!

A company which  generate alot of positive cashflow.....no borrowings.....surely got it own unique competitive advantage mah..!

Offline soulsimple

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #54 on: July 02, 2011, 02:44:39 PM »
Everi business got is value & usefulness....just like rubber glove, palm oil , cars, construction all got it own competitiveness.....thats why they make money loh...!
Of course....some business don have brand.....but then a slightly lower PE already compensate for this disadvantage mah....!

A company which  generate alot of positive cashflow.....no borrowings.....surely got it own unique competitive advantage mah..!

 :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

what u hav mentioned r basic requirements that i do look for too!!!!

why i wouldnt put money in analabs is bcoz i m not sure what they will do trrow. things always seem to b changing all the time. plus i dont think, from the last i saw, their core business to do well goin forward. i didnt c any durable advantage. plus it is hard enough for us to value all their businesses n to understand them all. do u think they know all their businesses well?

competitive advantage? i m not so sure.....but u know la, i could b totally wrong!!!!

 ;)
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Offline soulsimple

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #55 on: July 02, 2011, 02:48:42 PM »
u see .. i dont waste time asking this and that ... instead of asking ... i search for answer straight away.
While ppl asking this and that ... talking about what moat ... questioning sustainable or not ..
i busy collecting at 80 sen until become top 2 outsider shareholder .. right behind grahamsmun ...
BEST !

 :D :D :D


how u know Grahamsmum still holding? mayb he found a better buy n switch alreadi?
 :(
There are no words to describe the beauty of a simple ordinary life.
That's why we just don't hear much about them.

Online iiinvestsmart

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #56 on: July 02, 2011, 03:54:14 PM »
What IS FCF ? How u benchmark & value ?
FCF of Nestle is around Rn 2.40.....so at Price about value 5% Pa....this compare with risk free fixed Deposits of 3.5% p.a......not enough margin of safety don u think so ?

Look at analabs FCF of Rm 0.25..........agst share price 1.69....we are getting 17% p.a. won't u think attractive compare with Fixed deposits ?  

$100 in FD receiving 3.5% p.a.

$100 in Nestle receiving >3.5% DY p.a. today.

But there is a big difference between the two.

Over the next few years, the dividend of Nestle will continue (hopefully, but with high probability) to increase, in tandem with its earnings growth.  Thus the share price of Nestle too.

This is why Nestle is the equivalent of the equity bond like investing that Buffett likes to talk about.

There is definite safety of capital (perhaps, Raider, you wish for larger margin of safety) and the potential of a reasonable positive return.

Investing is very simple, if your thinking is simple and not muddled.  :)
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

Online iiinvestsmart

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #57 on: July 02, 2011, 04:28:40 PM »
u see .. i dont waste time asking this and that ... instead of asking ... i search for answer straight away.
While ppl asking this and that ... talking about what moat ... questioning sustainable or not ..
i busy collecting at 80 sen until become top 2 outsider shareholder .. right behind grahamsmun ...
BEST !

 :D :D :D


 :clap:
Well done.
Analabs is presently $1.63 and you have captured a return of 100% based on your cost of 80 sen.
So, how many years do you have to wait for the next doubling in the share price of Analabs, i.e. from $1.63 to $3.26?




ANALABS RESOURCES DISPOSES PROPERTY IN SHAH ALAM FOR RM7.5M
03 June 2011
ANALABS RESOURCES reported that 100%-owned INAGRO sb had on May 30, 2011 entered into an Agreement to dispose to LIGHTING EDITIONS sb a 1-1/2 storey factory on a 12,708 sq m plot of leasehold land i ...

ANALABS RESOURCES - PRINCIPAL OFFICER SHARE DISPOSAL
28 April 2011
ANALABS RESOURCES reported that Principal Officer WONG CHEW HAR had on Apr 26, 2011 disposed 600,000 shares in the Company at RM1.51 per share. ...

ANALABS RESOURCES - PRINCIPAL OFFICER SHARE DISPOSAL
17 August 2010
ANALABS RESOURCES reported that Principal Officer WONG CHEW HAR had on Aug 12, 2010 disposed 600,000 shares in the Company at RM1.62 per share. ...

ANALABS RESOURCES ACQUIRES SPECIAL PAPER MANUFACTURER
23 July 2009
ANALABS RESOURCES reported Jul 22, 2009 that the Company had entered into Agreement to acquire 100% equity in COVERIGHT SURFACES MALAYSIA sb from SURFACES HOLDINGS bv (vendor) for RM40m cash.

ANALABS RESOURCES REVALUES PROPERTIES
01 July 2009
ANALABS RESOURCES reported Jun 30, 2009 that a revaluation of the Company's properties had result in a Net Revaluation Surplus of RM4.8m or 8 sen per share increasing is Net Assets Value to RM1.94 ...
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

Offline soulsimple

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #58 on: July 02, 2011, 06:10:06 PM »
Benjamin Graham mentioned that his lifetime experience showed him there was high risk in having his investments only in bonds. In 1913, the price level had tripled and at the same time, interest had gone down a lot. So the old bonds with high coupon rates that had been called, no longer exist. The result was that the investor whose investments were solely in bonds has suffered both a reduction in income return and a large reduction in the purchasing power of whatever income or principal he had.

If a man with $5000 income, with little saved, didn’t expect to accumulate much out of that income, then he shouldn’t invest in any common stocks, as what he could gain by having a common stock component in his savings isn’t large enough to warrant the amount of intelligence and character needed to carry on an investment program in common stock soundly.

His portfolio should consist of insurance and government bonds. Besides, the most possible action for the man, who wished to build up an interest in stocks out of his savings, is to follow the accumulation programs in the investment fund area (investment companies).
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That's why we just don't hear much about them.

Offline soulsimple

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #59 on: July 02, 2011, 06:10:56 PM »
Ben began to cite the example of the widow who had all her money in common stocks, and was doing pretty well for a while. Then the market collapsed, she found her principal value greatly reduced. She was likely to get panicky to sell out at the bottom, or near the bottom, and had a harrowing experience as a result. It’s the same for most people; they sell stocks at low prices not because they have to but because they are scared. It was not the outer compulsion that governs it as much as the inner compulsion, drive, and inner apprehension.
There are no words to describe the beauty of a simple ordinary life.
That's why we just don't hear much about them.

Offline soulsimple

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #60 on: July 02, 2011, 06:12:14 PM »
To do intelligent investing, Ben Graham said that a person who was really determined to prepare himself to be an intelligent investor can do it. For example, an individual could take a correspondence course, learning the job just the way one would learn learn to play the piano. And the next best thing for him was to decide that he couldn’t get the optimum investment results without his optimum preparation. Otherwise, he could buy investment company shares on the regular basis. That was the concept of dollar-averaging.

Dollar averaging was the investment method in which he set aside regularly a fixed amount of money and invested it in common stocks generally, either in a single common stock or in the group investment through investment company shares.

By investing same amount of money regularly, let's say every three months, the investor got two advantages. First, over the years the investment reflects averaged market price rather than high market level – which was where he was likely to buy if he followed the crowd. Second, the arithmetic of dollar averaging gave the investor more shares at lower prices than at higher prices, so that the average cost was lower than the arithmetical average. If he put $1,000 in one kind of stock and the price was $10, he’d get $10 shares. If later it was $20, he’d get 50 shares. The investor bought more stocks at $10 than at $20. Consequently, the average price was less than $15

Over Ben’s past experience, the minimum time to take dollar averaging to produce results was 7 years, average 10 years, and the investor can start anytime. Even at the top of the market in 1929, the investor would have done all right by 10 years later. Nevertheless, there was still the question of whether investor should start dollar averaging when the market was is high.
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Offline soulsimple

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #61 on: July 02, 2011, 06:13:25 PM »
For the individual of income $100,000 or above, they shouldn’t do dollar averaging, as the higher up the person is on the income scale, the more variable generally is the amount of money that they had for the investment. If they wanted to become the expert investor, they should go over into the field of interesting situations, based on their knowledge and studies. The investment can range from growth stocks, to bargain securities, to special situations.

Growth stocks are described by Ben as a stock which 1) would be expanding its business and profits at more than an average rate, and 2) would invest the large part of its profit back in the business. However, the growth stock leads into the future, and we don’t have any knowledge of the future. Someone might have a more expert guess than others, but it was still a guess. Many mistakes have been made in buying growth stocks on the theory that the future would duplicate the past.
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Offline soulsimple

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #62 on: July 02, 2011, 06:15:11 PM »
In investing, waiting is a difficult operation itself. When the investor is waiting, he is wondering how much he’s missing, whether he’ll ever have the chance to get back at a better time. When chance does occur, he wonders when the right moment to start coming in is. All those things are difficult decisions to make. It is much easier to do the thing mechanically than it is to do it by these judgements.

When Benjamin Graham got asked how to identify underlying issues, he noted that the simplest test that he had was the value of company as a private business. If we can look at a company and say that at this price for the stock, the whole enterprise was selling at a figure which was clearly less than it would be worth to me if it were my business. In some cases, the very fact that the company was selling in the market for less than working capital alone, with no value given to fixed assets. That was the “prima face indication” that the price was too low.
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Offline soulsimple

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #63 on: July 02, 2011, 06:16:50 PM »
Last but not least, buying on margin shouldn’t be advised unless the investor was under exceptional circumstances. For that kind of investor, he’d already been in the market and had a considerable stake in common stocks – it would be sounder to start a selling policy at this stage. It could be in upward scale, involving small amounts at present, of it he really feels apprehensive, he might sell larger. After he sold it out, he might wait a year, decide he was wrong, and then go back in the market on dollar-averaging basis. At least the investor might say he was wrong intelligently.
There are no words to describe the beauty of a simple ordinary life.
That's why we just don't hear much about them.

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #64 on: July 02, 2011, 06:45:33 PM »
History has demonstrated that there are five basic principles that you should follow if you want to be truly successful.

Invest Only in Good Quality Growth Companies

Depending upon the size or maturity of the company, you should look for companies whose ―monotonous excellence produces consistent annual earnings growth of anywhere from 7% to as much as 20% compounded annually. As these companies grow, their share prices will ultimately follow, and your portfolio will reap the returns.

―Total Return (the combination of both capital appreciation and divi-dend yield) is, certainly, the name of the game, but it‘s best to invest in companies whose growth, rather than dividend income, is going to provide the bulk of the return.

But it‘s not enough to simply invest in growing businesses. You should also set high standards of quality for the companies in which you invest.

Companies of quality will outperform their peers, perform better in economic downturns, and/or see their share prices take large tumbles during the occasional stumble.

What Is a Quality Growth Company?


Of the five principles listed above, the fourth is the real ―trick as the others can be followed more or less mechanically. To invest only in high quality growth companies, you will have to prospect for good candidates and then analyze and evaluate each.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

Online iiinvestsmart

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #65 on: July 02, 2011, 06:49:40 PM »
Just What Do We Mean by Growth?

A successful company will pass through several phases of growth:

The startup phase when earnings are predictably below the break-even point. A period of explosive growth when the percentage increase in sales and earnings can be spectacular.

The mature growth period when revenue becomes so large that it is difficult to maintain a consistent increase in the percentage of growth.

The period of stabilization, or decline for companies that do not continue to rejuvenate their product mix or expand their target markets.

It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

Online iiinvestsmart

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #66 on: July 02, 2011, 06:51:37 PM »
You should invest only in companies that have a track record as a public company for at least five years and for which the data is readily available.

We are therefore interested in investing in companies that are at least five years into their explosive growth periods but that have not gone past their primes.

Obviously, the longer the company has had a successful track record—provided its management copes successfully with maturity—the more stable and risk-free it is apt to be.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

Online iiinvestsmart

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #67 on: July 02, 2011, 06:54:05 PM »
Depending upon the size of the company, fundamental investors should expect growth rates that vary from a low of about 7% to a high of around 20%.

Hence, if the company is an established one with sales over the $5 billion mark, a growth rate of as little as 7% might be acceptable. (The Total Return of such a company should have a substantial dividend yield component.)

At the other end of the spectrum, the newer company in its explosive growth period should show double digit growth. While we know that growth rates above 20% cannot be sustained forever, we look for higher growth rates as compensation for the increased associated risk.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

Online iiinvestsmart

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #68 on: July 02, 2011, 06:57:15 PM »
For example, if a company‘s sales for the current year are in the neighborhood of $300 million, we would look for a growth rate of better than 12%.

For a company with $1 billion in sales, we would want at least 8%.

These are the standards of growth that we will seek for investment.

Higher risk situations involving companies early in their life cycles are speculative and not of investment quality.

Depending upon the size of the company, fundamental investors should expect growth rates that vary from a low of about 7% to a high of around 20%.

Hence, if the company is an established one with sales over the $5 billion mark, a growth rate of as little as 7% might be acceptable. (The Total Return of such a company should have a substantial dividend yield component.)

At the other end of the spectrum, the newer company in its explosive growth period should show double digit growth. While we know that growth rates above 20% cannot be sustained forever, we look for higher growth rates as compensation for the increased associated risk.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

Online iiinvestsmart

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #69 on: July 02, 2011, 10:01:18 PM »

Just What Do We Mean by Growth?

A successful company will pass through several phases of growth:

1.  The startup phase when earnings are predictably below the break-even point.

2.  A period of explosive growth when the percentage increase in sales and earnings can be spectacular.

3.  The mature growth period when revenue becomes so large that it is difficult to maintain a consistent increase in the percentage of growth.

4.  The period of stabilization, or decline for companies that do not continue to rejuvenate their product mix or expand their target markets.


It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

Online stockraider

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #70 on: July 02, 2011, 10:15:40 PM »
$100 in FD receiving 3.5% p.a.

$100 in Nestle receiving >3.5% DY p.a. today.

But there is a big difference between the two.

Over the next few years, the dividend of Nestle will continue (hopefully, but with high probability) to increase, in tandem with its earnings growth.  Thus the share price of Nestle too.

This is why Nestle is the equivalent of the equity bond like investing that Buffett likes to talk about.

There is definite safety of capital (perhaps, Raider, you wish for larger margin of safety) and the potential of a reasonable positive return.

Investing is very simple, if your thinking is simple and not muddled.  :)
Why u think nestle dividend will increase tremendously when current yield is 3% p.a...........the company operating cashflow yield is only 5% p.a. ?
Why u think Analabs dividend yield will not increase substanstially when the current yield about 3% p.a. but its operating cashflow yield is about 17% p.a. ?

What type of logic ?

False sense of confidence loh...! Just bcos nestle name ? Be rational....just look at current fact & figure analab is well ahead.....with about Rm 40m....net cash equivalent in his balance sheet....already more than Rm 0.60 per share...!

This is beside positive operating cashflow....loh...!

Offline D ' LADY

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #71 on: July 02, 2011, 10:18:05 PM »
Why u think nestle dividend will increase tremendously when current yield is 3% p.a...........the company operating cashflow yield is only 5% p.a. ?
Why u think Analabs dividend yield will not increase substanstially when the current yield about 3% p.a. but its operating cashflow yield is about 17% p.a. ?

What type of logic ?

False sense of confidence loh...! Just bcos nestle name ? Be rational....just look at current fact & figure analab is well ahead.....with about Rm 40m....net cash equivalent in his balance sheet....already more than Rm 0.60 per share...!

This is beside positive operating cashflow....loh...!

apa ada pada nama ? .....glam ?....and kit kat sEDAAApppppp...
old :
DLADY
FN
NESTLE
PADINI
CBIP
PPB

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #72 on: July 02, 2011, 10:24:08 PM »
This point...raider disagree.....loh...! Always invest in huge undervalue company with high margin of safety & low gearing & preferably dividend paying.....this is a sure fire & easy way of investment.

Yes Raider agree that investment Growth company is also profitable if done properly mah !....but it is the 2nd best tech....raider use loh ! Why ?

1) Growth rate are difficult to establish....as the company grow bigger...its grow rate will slow....bcos of sheer size, competition and product life cycle. Alot people(esp analyst) mistakenly superimpose the same past growth rate in the future.!
Bcos this complication....raider think....this method can only be the 2nd best tech in the pecking order of fundamental money  making loh....!

This one i also disagree with raider too. Both types also can consider to invest ma, see la otak must boleh pusing ma, cannot say always this always that................................... ......................WAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAK AKAKAKAKAKA

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #73 on: July 02, 2011, 10:24:59 PM »
THE KEY IS DAVID (ANALAB) V GOLIATH(NESTLE)...!
ANALABS....JUST NEED DIVIDEND TO GO UP TO 8% OR RM 3.2M PAYOUT IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE A PAYOUT OF 5% PA WHEREAS REALIZE WILL REQUIRE DIVIDEND OF RM 2.40 PER SHARE OR RM 720M  IN THE NEXT 2 YR FOR THE SAME YIELD BEARING IN MIND NESTLE SHARE PRICE IN RM 48.00 AND ANALABS IS RM 1.69....!

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #74 on: July 02, 2011, 10:27:42 PM »
THE KEY IS DAVID (ANALAB) V GOLIATH(NESTLE)...!
ANALABS....JUST NEED DIVIDEND TO GO UP TO 8% OR RM 3.2M PAYOUT IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE A PAYOUT OF 5% PA WHEREAS REALIZE WILL REQUIRE DIVIDEND OF RM 2.40 PER SHARE OR RM 720M  IN THE NEXT 2 YR FOR THE SAME YIELD BEARING IN MIND NESTLE SHARE PRICE IN RM 48.00 AND ANALABS IS RM 1.69....!


Main problem is some people only invest in good quality companies with track record ma, so analabs not ma, so say nestle better lor, so easy to understand :giggle: :giggle:..............................WAKAKAKAK AKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKA

Offline leno

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #75 on: July 02, 2011, 10:29:38 PM »
got easy road .. and yet choose difficult road to take .. ppl is always like that one .. this is called "inability to learn" ...

 :D :D :D

Online iiinvestsmart

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #76 on: July 02, 2011, 10:30:09 PM »
Just What Do We Mean by Growth?

A successful company will pass through several phases of growth:

1.  The startup phase when earnings are predictably below the break-even point.

2.  A period of explosive growth when the percentage increase in sales and earnings can be spectacular.

3.  The mature growth period when revenue becomes so large that it is difficult to maintain a consistent increase in the percentage of growth.

4.  The period of stabilization, or decline for companies that do not continue to rejuvenate their product mix or expand their target markets.



How Do You Find Such Companies?

There are lots of good ways to prospect for likely candidates to study. Here are just a few: Find out the names of the companies that produce the prod-ucts and services that you use and think are excellent. Ask your broker for a suggestion or two. Join an investment club.

The point here is that you can get a good idea from almost anywhere. There are as many suggestions out there as there are companies, and one might be just as good as another. But, so long as you clearly understand that you should never, never, never buy a stock as a result of a ―tip, you‘re going to do just fine.

Peter Lynch, one of the nation‘s most successful fund managers, said that one of his greatest picks was ―L‘Eggs—the hosiery sold in the supermarkets. His wife came home one day, extolling the virtues of the product and the concept and he decided to take a look at the company! Notice that we didn‘t say ―bought the stock. We said that he decided to ―take a look at the company. He did buy it, but only after doing a thorough job of homework on it.

Most ―tips fall in the category of either ―inside information or new product potential.

In the case of the former, you must ask yourself, ―If that information is so new, exciting, and/or secret, how come the person who told me about it knew about it? (If it was your stock-broker, you may rest assured that the street has already discounted it.)

In the case of new product information— ABC Company is about to introduce a revolutionary new widget —you must ask yourself, ―What percentage of current revenue could such a new product generate if that product or service is successful?
- Usually the answer will be that sales of the new product will bring in only a tiny fraction of the current sales figures.
- If the company is so small that it would have that much effect on the company‘s bottom line, then it is probably still too small (new) a company to bother with or the introduction of the new product is too risky to gamble your capital on.

Write down any suggestions you receive, the names of firms that produce the products that you know are winners, or services you think are particularly important for the times. In short, the best criterion for finding a company that meets your needs is to find products or services that are successful.

Read the financial newspapers and newsletters and see what the analysts are saying about some of the ―comers. Be sensitive to information about industries and specific companies in the regular newspapers and other media.

Common sense and a little observation are far better providers of stock tips than the average broker whose company may have its own interests at heart when it ―suggests he push a stock! The moral of the story is that you can find good candidates anywhere.

Once you have a company you are interested in—or a list of them—you can then go to work.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #77 on: July 02, 2011, 10:31:05 PM »
Main problem is some people only invest in good quality companies with track record ma, so analabs not ma, so say nestle better lor, so easy to understand :giggle: :giggle:..............................WAKAKAKAK AKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKA

This is like some people use dividend model for value shares ma, so if no dividend or low dividend so automatically become overvalue lor, understand or not now? Simple rite? :giggle: :giggle: :giggle:........WAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKA

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #78 on: July 02, 2011, 10:39:11 PM »
Raider,

Analabs failed to satisfy the quality criteria in my assessment. 
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #79 on: July 02, 2011, 10:42:34 PM »
Raider,

Analabs failed to satisfy the quality criteria in my assessment. 

Raider, i oledi told you so ma, see la i clever or not? or u c2pid * *? :giggle: :giggle: :giggle:....................................... ........................WAKAKAKAKAKA

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #80 on: July 02, 2011, 10:51:24 PM »
Raider,

Analabs failed to satisfy the quality criteria in my assessment. 

Assessing quality of the company is certainly a critical investment issue. 

You must decide whether the company is a ―good one or not.

You have presumably decided that the company‘s track record of growth and earnings has been sufficiently stable and strong to warrant your consideration or you would have already abandoned the study.

This is the place where you assess the management team‘s capability to sustain that growth. This is one of the most important judgments you will make.

Why? Because, if you‘re wrong, you may be ―seduced into thinking that the stock is a great value when, in reali-ty, the stock is selling at a low price for a very good reason.


I cannot stress this point enough: The worse a company per-forms, the better a value it will appear to be.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #81 on: July 02, 2011, 11:10:18 PM »
Benefits of Long-Term Investing

1.  80% Successful Stock Selection Record
Because long-term trends in the performance of companies are reasonably predictable, it is possible to pick as many as four winners out of every five stocks that you choose. Put another way, that‘s an 80% success rate.


2.  Money Can Double Every Five Years
It is also possible, with reasonable diligence, to replace the one out of five that may be a loser before it significantly damages your portfolio. Those who do can enjoy 15% (or even higher) compounded, annual growth in the value of their holdings—a rate that would double your money in five years.


3.  Tax Benefits
The best gains are unrealized gains—the increase in the value of your stock as it sits in your portfolio. You don‘t have to pay taxes on your gains until you sell. Short-term investors tend to sell their winners and wait for their losers to grow. (They eventually wind up with a portfolio full of losers.) That‘s why they don‘t make out as well as the average long-term investor who stays with the winners for the long haul.


4.  Simple Procedures
The fundamental investment methodology is not ―rocket science. Anyone can learn it quickly and use it successfully for a lifetime.


5.  Carefree Portfolio Maintenance
There is no need to anxiously watch your stock prices hourly, daily—or even weekly—as short-term investors and speculators do. If you wish to update your prices and watch your progress on a monthly basis, that‘s great. But you can do a fine job of managing your investments if you tend to them only every two or three months.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #82 on: July 02, 2011, 11:30:09 PM »
About Judgment

An indispensable ingredient in successful stock evaluation and selection is the application of ―judgment. While not nearly so complicated as some would have you believe, this is nonetheless more of an art than a science. It‘s a personal skill that you will develop and fine tune as you gain experience.

However, don‘t be intimidated by your lack of experience if you‘re new at it. In fact, because you‘re apt to be more conservative than the investor who has been doing it for a while, you could very well have better results.

The essence of judgment, in this context, is the application of the wisdom that you gain about industries, the natures and ―personalities of companies within certain industries—or just in and of themselves—and the significance of the factors that contributed to the history that you are studying. Such items as the extent to which acquisitions—rather than increases in sales— contributed to growth, the extent of past and potential competition, the changes in management, and so on, all contribute to your judgment. Nor are these at all mysterious. They are all common sense issues that you will simply be more mindful of as you progress.

The approach described below is a very basic approach to help those of you who may be still learning fundamental investing to make the crucial judgment decisions. Each of these suggestions is directed toward the most conservative action to take on the basis of the numbers and the pictures that you see, alone. You may very well change these steps as you grow in experience and gain confidence.

The Three Levels of Judgment
There are three distinct levels of ―judgment:
1. Discounting irrelevant data or ―Cleaning up data to be sure that only applicable data is used in assessing historical trends or performance.
2. Estimating future trends or performance based upon the historical assessment.
3. Estimating future price performance based upon those future trends.


1.  Discounting Irrelevant Data
With respect to the relevancy of data, we know that history cannot be denied. What has happened has happened, and the only decision that you can make about an historical event is whether or not it is applicable in your study to influence your vision of the future.
Eliminating ―outliers is your way of discarding irrelevant data to make historical information more useful and to guide you toward the next step.

2.  Estimating Future Trends
Using your conservative historical trends as starting points, you seek to predict what the future trends in the company‘s performance might be. Here again, you will want to be reasonably modest in your view of the future.
Analysts are paid to be accurate. You are rewarded for being right.
The more modest your estimates, the more likely you are to be right!

3.  Estimating Future Price Performance
By making careful and conservative estimates of the company’s performance, you can then forecast, within limits, how the stock‘s price will perform—and therefore what kind of return you might expect your investment to give you.


Generally, it pays to accept the conservative alternative in all cases when decisions must be made. Lower estimates in projected growth rates will result in less optimistic price predictions. Since you are focused upon investing rather than speculating—and since there are many stocks available that can meet your requirements—it would seem foolish indeed to ―* the figures just to justify the purchase of a particular stock.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #83 on: July 03, 2011, 06:09:11 AM »
Diversification

One of the basics of sound investing—and the purely ―defensive one—is that the portfolio should be adequately diversified both in terms of industries and in terms of size of companies.

You should be able to track easily the number of shares of each stock held in the portfolio, the dollar value of each holding, and the dollar-weighted percentage of the total portfolio represented by each.

Where in the past, many have tried to appraise their portfolios‘ diversification by looking at the stock list and counting only how many stocks are in a particular category, you may now measure true diversification. By that we mean the percentage of your portfolio‘s total dollar value that is devoted to each holding.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #84 on: July 03, 2011, 06:12:18 AM »
Diversification

By Industry
Take a good look at your diversification by industry by % of Portfolio and see which positions occupy the largest percentage of your portfolio.

There are a number of industry sector breakdowns that may be used to group the host of industries represented in the stock market. Many brokerages and data providers use broad category breakdowns that you could adopt. Or, you may come up with yet another that pleases you.

Generally, the most effective groupings are those that segregate the industries by groups that are not similarly affected by the business cycle, or the ups and downs of the economy. Suffice it to say that you should select a sector breakdown that makes sense to you.

Theoretically, you should have a roughly equal percentage of your investment in each of the industry sectors. If you are heavily overloaded in any single industry or sector—no matter how well it appears to be behaving at the moment— you are probably vulnerable. It may pay you to explore more aggressively the possibility of selling a portion of a holding whose great success has already caused it to represent a very lopsided portion of your portfolio.

In any event, by ranking your percentage of portfolio column from largest to smallest, you can get a much clearer picture of your diversification situation and act accordingly.



It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #85 on: July 03, 2011, 06:16:14 AM »
Diversification

By size
It is recommended that you strive for roughly 50% of your portfolio to be in medium sized companies with the rest split between larger and smaller.

Your portfolio should enable you to monitor this diversification, with a breakdown of the percentage of your dollars that are invested in ―Small, ―Medium, and ―Large companies. You will also wish to know the figure that represents the total value of your portfolio.

While there are many accepted ways to determine size (e.g. market capitalization, revenues, net profit, etc.), here is a very simple method that is about as good as any rule of thumb.  Any company whose annual sales figure between $500 million to $5 billion is considered a ―Medium size company. Those with fewer are considered ―Small companies, those with more are considered ―Large.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Portfolio Management
« Reply #86 on: July 03, 2011, 08:20:03 AM »
Portfolio Management

An Overview

You should be able to pick four winners out of every five stocks selected assuming that you use your knowledge conscientiously and conservatively.

However, selecting the right stocks isn‘t all there is to successful investing. The job is only half done. It‘s now time to look at the ―Sell side-or at least to consider what happens after you own your stocks. This is where many investors begin to lose interest and fall by the wayside in their discipline. This is also the place where their track record can easily suffer.

Portfolio Management is the art of continually improving the quality of your portfolio to maximize your return.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: Portfolio Management - looking at the SELL side
« Reply #87 on: July 03, 2011, 08:28:02 AM »
Portfolio Management is the art of continually improving the quality of your portfolio to maximize your return.


You do this by:

- Watching the performance of the company rather than the stock.

- Selling a stock only when the company shows significant signs that it will not produce the sales and/or earnings growth that you expected when you bought it, and

- Replacing the stock you‘ve sold or intend to sell with one of equal or better quality having a better potential for return.


It is not:

- Selling stocks that perform well, while keeping those that don‘t, in the hopes that they will. (Why sell your winners in hopes your losers will turn into winners? You‘ll wind up with a portfolio full of losers!)

- Letting the price influence your selling decisions. Portfolio tracking, performance measurement, or record keeping are often misconstrued as portfolio management. They are, in fact, merely ways of measuring how well you have managed your portfolio.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: Portfolio Management - looking at the SELL side
« Reply #88 on: July 03, 2011, 08:31:20 AM »
When and Why to sell

There is really notime to sell; however, there are certainly reasons to do so.

Most investors, less successful than you will be, believe that you should watch for the price to rise ―high enough—whatever that means—and then sell it to take your profit.

Successful fundamental investors know that ―profit taking is often profit-losing. :)
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: Portfolio Management - looking at the SELL side
« Reply #89 on: July 03, 2011, 08:36:17 AM »
―Rules for Selling a Stock

The first rule for selling is . . . don‘t! . . . unless:


1) The company has had an adverse management change.
2) Profit margins are declining or the financial structure is deteriorating.
3) Direct or indirect competition stands to affect the company‘s long-term prosperity.
4) A company‘s success is too dependent upon a single product whose cycle is running out.
5) The company is in a cyclical industry and the cycle is about to start down.
6) You must, in order to maintain adequate diversification.
7) An issue of equal or greater quality offers more gain prospects on the upside and less risk on the downside.
8.) The stock is way overpriced (at least 150% of the five-year Average P/E) and the company‘s earnings are growing at 12% or less. Even then, you might consider holding or selling only some of it.

When and Why to sell

There is really notime to sell; however, there are certainly reasons to do so.

Most investors, less successful than you will be, believe that you should watch for the price to rise ―high enough—whatever that means—and then sell it to take your profit.

Successful fundamental investors know that ―profit taking is often profit-losing. :)
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: Portfolio Management - looking at the SELL side
« Reply #90 on: July 03, 2011, 08:40:02 AM »
―Rules for Selling a Stock

The first rule for selling is . . . don‘t! . . . unless:


1) The company has had an adverse management change.
2) Profit margins are declining or the financial structure is deteriorating.
3) Direct or indirect competition stands to affect the company‘s long-term prosperity.
4) A company‘s success is too dependent upon a single product whose cycle is running out.
5) The company is in a cyclical industry and the cycle is about to start down.
6) You must, in order to maintain adequate diversification.
7) An issue of equal or greater quality offers more gain prospects on the upside and less risk on the downside.
8.) The stock is way overpriced (at least 150% of the five-year Average P/E) and the company‘s earnings are growing at 12% or less. Even then, you might consider holding or selling only some of it.


Note that, of the eight reasons for selling listed above, only the eighth suggests that you might sell to take a profit-and then only if:
a) the price is way above average; and
b) the company is growing relatively slowly.

The first five of the rules call for chucking losers.

The sixth suggests ―weeding and feeding in order not to be grossly over weighted in any particular industry or market sector.

The seventh and eighth call for replacing a stock with a low potential only when you can find one as good or better with a greater possible return.
It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #91 on: July 03, 2011, 08:52:28 AM »
Main problem is some people only invest in good quality companies with track record ma, so analabs not ma, so say nestle better lor, so easy to understand :giggle: :giggle:..............................WAKAKAKAK AKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKA

Just put it this way
1) Hard Core Fundamental investment ala Ben Graham -All practise & genuinely & deligently and completely by Raider & Leno but not BB loh...!
2) Warren Buffet technique-Is also practise by Leno and Raider selectively.......when it is valuation compelling loh...But more adopted by BB loh...!
3) BB..........had been mislead...on false sense of optimism on buying into overvalue Growth bluechips like most fund managers do....but raider and Leno will never will loh..! Unless actually plan for the purpose of pure speculation...!

Conclusion.....Leno & Raider....really capitalise on Mr Market........the classic Graham's philosophy loh...!
There are diff between Leno-Raider method v BB method.....but we are still fundamental investor....but of course Leno-Raider is more Value Fundamental loh...!

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #92 on: July 03, 2011, 08:58:51 AM »
have read through this thread and noted many theoires, principles, formulas but etc frankly have all these help in klse where shares can be so erratic that it goes against the intrinsic and fair value of the counter? be good if we can get feedbacks from all bros here,,,,

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Re: Portfolio Management
« Reply #93 on: July 03, 2011, 09:00:33 AM »
very interesting and educational,,,care to share what portfolios u are in??

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #94 on: July 03, 2011, 09:03:51 AM »
have read through this thread and noted many theoires, principles, formulas but etc frankly have all these help in klse where shares can be so erratic that it goes against the intrinsic and fair value of the counter? be good if we can get feedbacks from all bros here,,,,

The issue...is that u must take advantage & capitalise on the erratic price....by taking advantage of Mr Market Mah...!

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #95 on: July 03, 2011, 09:09:18 AM »
YA,,we look into erratic priceS cause by erractic market and have to ignore all the theories, fundamentals etc written here ,,,we  punt in tandem with the MARKET FORCES ma

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #96 on: July 03, 2011, 11:33:27 AM »
Just What Do We Mean by Growth?

A successful company will pass through several phases of growth:

1.  The startup phase when earnings are predictably below the break-even point.

2.  A period of explosive growth when the percentage increase in sales and earnings can be spectacular.

3.  The mature growth period when revenue becomes so large that it is difficult to maintain a consistent increase in the percentage of growth.

4.  The period of stabilization, or decline for companies that do not continue to rejuvenate their product mix or expand their target markets.



Looking at Analabs....it is actually at the stage of start up & explosive growth stage....Growth in revenue & profits actual exploded in 2006 to 2010 from a humble EPS Rm 0.06....in 2006 to an explosive EPS of Rm 0.29....an average compound growth rate exceeding 60% pa wah !.

The beauty of analabs is that despite shooting up in eps like a rocket.....the balance sheet remain solid....with a net cash equivalent per share close to Rm 0.40 mah!.
Despite the explosive growth With NTA per share of Rm 2.50 & EPS of Rm 0.29.....analabs still trade at a wide discount to the market at Rm 1.69........there is misprice in valuation.....in which savvy investor....should capitalise on woh....!

Those who are in interested in analabs....should refer to the blog nextrade....who recommend analab strongly...in which raider & senior analyst also concur loh....!

The beauty of analabs....is that despite......the explosive growth in 2010....the shate price at Rm 1.69,still veri undemanding valuation of PE 5.5x .........the best thing this fits the investment criteria of famous Growth Grand Master Philip Fisher and Famous Grand Master of Value Investor Ben Graham..........veri rare situation....to fit this criteria....it is like the esclipse of the moon .....when everything come in line Loh....!

Another positive point raider noted....is technically...Analabs is strong and close to a breakout.....with trading volume increasing drastically. That further support the notion....mkt starting to take note of analabs solid performance in terms of growth, undervaluation and solid balance sheet mah...! 

So don let soothsayer....disappoint....u......when this is clearly a growth undervalue company loh...!

Check it our for yourself mah ?

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #97 on: July 03, 2011, 12:04:39 PM »
have read through this thread and noted many theoires, principles, formulas but etc frankly have all these help in klse where shares can be so erratic that it goes against the intrinsic and fair value of the counter? be good if we can get feedbacks from all bros here,,,,

Of course it helps ma, just look at my MNRB la, this one tak rada otak stock pick, sure to make big money one, otherwise i would not even put my ********* on the line ma :giggle: :giggle: :giggle:..............WAKAKAKAKAKAKAKA

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #98 on: July 03, 2011, 12:09:37 PM »
The issue...is that u must take advantage & capitalise on the erratic price....by taking advantage of Mr Market Mah...!

MNRB one of them loh, how can making so much money but price still stuck? Sooner or later price sure go up one otherwise i fry my ********* for you all to eat ar :giggle: :giggle: :giggle:.............WAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKA

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Re: 3i Investing Whispers
« Reply #99 on: July 03, 2011, 01:17:45 PM »
MNRB one of them loh, how can making so much money but price still stuck? Sooner or later price sure go up one otherwise i fry my ********* for you all to eat ar :giggle: :giggle: :giggle:.............WAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKA

It’s better to buy a wonderful company at fair price than a fair company at wonderful price.

1.  Understand the business
2.  Business must have DCA
3.  Management with integrity
4.  Buy at a sensible price

Big Fat Pitch.  Focus Investing.  Long term portfolio for capital appreciation and income.